Bucks County SPCA Private Non-Profit Serving
Bucks County Since 1912
24 Hour Emergency Phone: 215.794.7425

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We are at cat-pacity and need your help!

As of today, the Bucks County SPCA is feeding, sheltering and providing medical and other lifesaving care for 343 animals between our two shelters and foster program. That’s a lot of kibble, litter and medicine, not to mention the staffing, utilities and other essentials.

The vast majority of these animals are not yet ready for adoption, including:

  • 101 cats, dogs and farm animals held in protective custody. These animals have been rescued through our animal cruelty investigations, including the 80 animals rescued from a so-called “sanctuary” in July. Due to COVID-related court closures this summer, we’ve had to hold more animals longer until their cases are settled, adding to the backlog behind the scenes at the shelters.
  • Many animals in foster care, mostly tiny kittens but also adult cats, dogs, rabbits and farm animals with medical or other needs.
  • Dozens of animals requiring prolonged medical treatment before they can go home. This summer brought us many senior, sick or injured animals requiring special care by our vet team. And we’ve been busy dipping dozens of kittens in medicated baths to cure them of contagious skin diseases.

People are often surprised to learn that our shelters are full when they may see only a small number of available pets up for adoption. Our cats and dogs fly into homes in under a week (on average) once they are cleared for adoption, so the turnover in our adoption kennels is quick. What is not seen are the hundreds of animals still recovering from illness, waiting for a victory in the courts, or in need of a little more time to grow big and strong.

In short, animals are coming in faster than they are leaving for new homes. And at the same time, thanks in part to COVID, income is down and expenses are up.

We need your help to keep up with the demand for services during this challenging time. Give a resiliency gift today to help give our shelter pets a second chance at happiness.

A gift of $20 provides initial vaccines and testing; $50 covers spay/neuter surgery and microchipping; $100 provides medication for a sick animal.

Please give what you can. Together, we’ll make sure no animal goes without, even in these challenging times.

Sadly, we know many of you are struggling to care for your pets this year. Please reach out if you need help. We can provide re-homing services, pet behavior assistance, or point you to food pantries who offer pet food and supplies to county residents.

Bucks County SPCA rescues 62 animals from Animal “Sanctuary”

Lahaska, PA – After an extensive investigation, the Bucks County SPCA (BCSPCA) rescued 62 animals in urgent need from a rural property in Plumstead Township on Wednesday, July 29, 2020. Holly Hoagland, the property’s owner, claimed to be operating an animal sanctuary. Charges of animal cruelty are pending. 

Multiple animals, including 41 ducks and chickens, were found to be living in filthy pens, trapped in temperatures of over 100 degrees Fahrenheit with no access to food or water. Four of the sheep on the property had extremely thick, matted coats and were also without access to food or water. Eight cats and kittens appeared to be ill and were living in unsanitary conditions. 

Officer Thompson and her team served a search warrant, and with assistance from Plumstead Police Department and the Plumstead Fire Department, transported the suffering overheated animals to BCSPCA’s comfortable barn and pastures in Quakertownthe cats and kittens will be cared for in the society’s shelter on Reservoir RoadThe BCSPCA veterinary team is overseeing the medical evaluation and treatment of the 62 animals. 

While we are saddened to witness suffering of this scale, we stand ready at all times to rescue both pets and farm animals from situations like this anywhere in Bucks County. The support we receive from the local community means these animals will get the medical treatment and expert care they so desperately need, and the person responsible will face charges of animal cruelty,” said Linda Reider, executive director of the BCSPCA. “We cannot change these animals’ past, but we can change their future.” 

The community can help by donating to the BCSPCA Animal Relief Fund which will help fund the care of these animals. Donations can be made online or by check sent to BCSPCA, PO Box 277, Lahaska, PA 18931. Designate your gift for “Animal Relief Fund.” 

Pet Food Drives to Help Neighbors in Need

May 12 at Bucks County Opportunity Council’s Fresh Connect program. On hand to distribute the food were members of Bucks County SPCA, Bucks County Animal Response Team and Animal Lifeline.

Thousands of pounds of food have been donated to pets in need thanks to our community and these caring organizations. We appreciate all of your support through this difficult time. Thank you to all who helped Bucks County pets thrive in this crisis.

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Many families are struggling to make ends meet during this public health crisis. That includes struggling to feed their pets. You can help by donating dry or wet cat or dog food to collection centers at the local businesses listed below. These pet food donations will be distributed to more than a dozen food pantries across the county to help families feed their pets.

Please do not bring donations directly to Bucks County SPCA shelters.

Martino’s Auto Center
674 N Main Street, Doylestown, PA 18901
Call Dan or Sara at 215-348-1466
Monday – Friday / 8 AM – 5 PM 

Keenan Motors Dealership
3664 North Easton Road, Doylestown, PA 18902
 215-348-0800
Monday – Friday / 9 AM  PM 

Bucks County SPCA is proud to partner with BCART, Bucks County Emergency Management, Women’s Animal Center, Animal Lifeline, Bridge Clinic and Sam’s Hope – together we’re working to collect and distribute pet food to support local families through the food pantry network. With your help, we’ll make sure no pet goes hungry.

Helpful Tips for Pet Owners during Covid-19 Pandemic

The PA Department of Agriculture has sourced the following guidelines to help pet owners protect both themselves and their pets during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Firstly, pet owners are encouraged to buy pet food and supplies as they normally would, without stockpiling, so that all pet owners can continue to have reliable access. 

Pet owners are encouraged to do the following:

  • Identify a family member or friend who can care for pets if someone in the household becomes ill. 
  • Have crates, food, and extra supplies on hand for quick movement of pets. Practice social distancing when walking or exercising pets.
  • Check in on neighbors (while practicing social distancing) who may need help caring for their pets. 
  • If your pets have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, it is recommended to give them a bath and limit their contact with anyone under quarantine. 
  • Pet owners are reminded to wash hands frequently throughout the day with hot water and soap for a minimum of 20 seconds. 
  • Be sure all vaccines are up to date in the event boarding becomes necessary. 
  • Ensure medications are documented with dosages and administration directions, including the prescription and the contact information for your veterinarian. 
  • Pets should have identification: collar with dog license and rabies tag or any other vanity style tag with owner information. Information can also be placed on the pet’s cage depending on the type of pet.
  • Place a list of pets in the home on your front door for emergency responders. Include a description of each animal, location in home, or on the property. 

Our pets are a great source of comfort and joy. Taking a few precautionary steps will help ensure their safety and your peace of mind in the midst of any crisis. 

Learn more at the PA Department of Agriculture website: https://www.agriculture.pa.gov/Pages/COVID-19.aspx 

Animal Cruelty Investigation gets a lift from Smith Foundation

New vehicle for animal cruelty investigation

Thanks to a generous contribution from the Josephine and Evelyn S. Smith Foundation, the Bucks County SPCA’s team of humane police officers has a reliable new vehicle for responding to more than 500 calls for help each year.

The foundation’s investment allowed the BCSPCA the opportunity to buy a new Toyota RAV4, replacing a 9-year-old vehicle with extensive repair needs. Humane police officers are on the road 7 days a week covering hundreds of miles crisscrossing the county responding to calls. For animals in Bucks County, the new vehicle means help is at the ready 365 days a year.

“In 2019 we saw a huge spike in cruelty complaints, court cases, and animals needing to be rescued from cruelty or neglect,” reported Linda Reider, executive director of the Bucks County SPCA. “Our team rescued 545 animals last year, nearly triple the number rescued in 2018. From very large hoarding cases, to a single animal cruelly treated, response time can make all the difference. It’s critical that our humane police officers have a reliable vehicle so that each complaint is investigated as quickly as possible.”

The BCSPCA investigates cases of abuse and neglect for domestic and farm animals anywhere in Bucks County. Our specially trained team of humane police officers respond to every complaint received, enforcing the state’s animal cruelty laws.

One call can save a life.

If you suspect an animal is being neglected or treated cruelly, please call our 24-hour tip line 215-794-7425 or email reportcruelty@bcspca.org. All tips are confidential.

The BCSPCA has served the animals and people of Bucks County since its incorporation by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1912. Our organization was founded by a small but determined group of citizens who patrolled the county, initially investigating cruelty to farm animals. Unchanged since 1912 is our commitment to make Bucks County the most humane community possible, knowing well that it benefits not only animals, but people too.

BCSPCA rescues 24 starved cats living in an unheated car

BREAKING NEWS: Late in the evening yesterday, Bucks County SPCA’s Chief Humane Police Officer, Nikki Thompson rescued 24 sick cats found living in an unheated car in Morrisville. She had been searching for the vehicle for two days. An online tip from a concerned citizen enabled her to pinpoint its location.

What she found was disturbing. The cats were cold, thirsty, underweight and in poor condition. They were immediately transported to the warmth and safety of the BCSPCA’s shelter in Lahaska where they gratefully emptied multiple water and food bowls. All the animals will be examined by the organization’s veterinary team and begin specific treatments to help them recover.

The cats’ owner reportedly collected the animals from the property of an apartment building. Our organization negotiated the surrender of all 24 cats, which means once they return to health, they can be placed for adoption without further legal action. We will continue to work with the individual to prevent a repeat of this kind of hoarding situation.

BCSPCA’s Executive Director Linda Reider expressed gratitude for the quick work of the community to help put a stop to the suffering of these poor cats. “We are grateful for people who speak up on behalf of those who have no voice. Thanks to a tip received by Officer Thompson, two dozen sick and hungry cats were spared another night of exposure to below-freezing temperatures. They are now safe and warm, and getting much-needed medical care from our team. In 2019, we rescued a record-breaking 600 animals from cruelty and neglect. Our hope is that far fewer animals require our lifesaving services in 2020, but, as always, we are ready 24 hours a day to respond to calls for help anywhere in Bucks County.”

You can help today by donating to our Animal Relief Fund which provides food, medical treatment and ongoing care for animals rescued through animal cruelty investigations. Donations can be made online at https://www.bcspca.org/support/donate-online/
by phone at 215-794-7425, or by visiting our shelters in Lahaska and Quakertown.

Barney’s Best Life by Alison Baker

I recently lost my “old man dog,” Barney. I knew his time would be short. He was 13 years old with a distinguished gray muzzle and a couple of tumors when we brought him home from the shelter. I’m heartbroken now that he’s gone, but this is not a story about death – it’s about a life well lived.

Like many animal lovers, I routinely check the BCSPCA’s website for hard luck cases.  We call our two acres the “Island of the Misfit Toys.” All are welcome here, regardless of their special needs. I saw Barney’s picture a few times online, but I wasn’t sure we could handle a fourth dog.

Barney had been waiting at the shelter for about three months when July rolled around. That’s my birthday and our anniversary month, and we agreed that it seemed better to spend the money taking care of Barney, for whatever time he had left, than buying gifts or taking a vacation.  So off we went to meet the old man!

He was sleeping when we first saw him, amidst the ruckus of the dog room. He seemed friendly but guarded. When we took Barney out for a walk, he wasn’t sure he wanted to leave the building. He tried his hardest to ignore us: standing at the end of the leash, facing away from us, pretending we weren’t there. But we saw something in him and decided to bring him home.

A staff member at the shelter asked to take a photo of Barney’s long-awaited adoption.  Just as the picture was being snapped, he turned his head and gave me a lick on the face – like he knew he had finally been chosen and was going home.

Barney met the rest of the dog crew at our house and immediately found a bed to lounge on. You could see the relief in his face—here was a quiet place to finally get some rest.

Early on we learned that Barney was his own man, with his own habits. In the mornings, before work, I put my shoes on while hiding in the closet, because for Barney, shoes meant walks. My family soon started calling Barney my personal trainer, insisting on his daily walks and goading me into it until I relented. He hung his head out the car window on the ride to the park, an expression of pure joy on his face.

With Barney’s exercise program, we were soon walking 10 to 12 miles per week. He often went for a swim in the creek.  Other dogs would run, leap, and chase sticks in the water, but Barney wanted none of that.  He was content to stand in the water and just look around.  With enough water in the creek, he was happy to demonstrate what a powerful, confident swimmer he was. People often stopped to watch him, and they’d smile at his happy face. He turned strangers into friends everywhere he went.

That was the thing about Barney and why he is so missed. He was a character with a huge heart to match. He lived each day to the fullest, with no regard for what his old life had been like. He was living #barneysbestlife, the tag I used to document our adventures on social media.

His time with us was short, only a few precious months. The loss hit me hard. Who knew an old dog, lost and overlooked by others, could become so precious to us! He spent the last months of his life surrounded by people who loved him and living his best life. Love isn’t marked by years. I know we’ll find another old dog to welcome home one day.

[Written by BCSPCA staff] Alison’s wait to find another old dog was not a long one. JoJo is a 12-year-old chihuahua that had been returned to our shelter and had a lengthy medical history. This small senior is full of spunk and pep, he brought a lot of joy to our staff and we would take him out to play whenever we could. Alison happened to see a video of our play sessions on social media and knew he was the one. On November 24, 2019, he was adopted. We are so happy it could be her. He is currently playing with every single dog toy he can on the “Island of Misfit Toys” and we are all extremely grateful he can bring a smile to Alison’s face once more.

Giving Tuesday is approaching!

You can help reduce the number of homeless kittens in Bucks County! Help us, Help Them! This Giving Tuesday, BCSPCA is raising critically needed funds to spay and neuter Bucks County cats. Just one $40 donation will pay for spay/neuter surgery and vaccines for one deserving cat.
This service is in high demand. So far this year we’ve performed more than 700 subsidized cat sterilizations. Cats can have up to 3 litters each year. That adds up to a lot of homeless kittens!
Give December 3 to help reduce the overwhelming numbers of homeless kittens in Bucks County. Giving will be available through our website and Facebook page starting early 12/3.
The Bucks County SPCA is a donor-supported independent nonprofit (we are not part of the ASPCA or PSPCA). We could’t help thousands of pets each year without the support of people like you.
Thank you for being a champion for the animals!

Dog Owners Beware of new Fraudulent Dog Licensing Website

A warning for all dog owners in Pennsylvania – a fraudulent dog license website is scamming people out of their money. This website: www.padoglicense.online is fraudulent and is not associated with the state.

The real dog licensing website is: www.licenseyourdogpa.pa.gov. Please make sure this is the website you use to buy or renew your dog license.

The Bucks County SPCA also sells yearly dog licences at our two shelters and we have the paperwork needed to send in for a lifetime license (dog must be present and micro-chipped).

We recommend all owners get their dogs licensed. Fines for unlicensed dogs can be up to $300.  If you have used the fraudulent website and need assistance, please contact the PA Attorney General Bureau of Consumer Protection at 1-800-441-2555.

BCSPCA Wins Custody of Cats Rescued from Massive Doylestown Hoarding Case

In a major win for the animals, the Bucks County SPCA has been awarded ownership of the cats and kittens rescued on May 7, 2019 from a Doylestown property rented by Lori Romanisko. At the time of their removal from the overcrowded filthy conditions in the townhome, 59 cats were found deceased, and 141 living cats were all in need of immediate medical attention. Some even required emergency surgery by the BCSPCA veterinary team.

Bootsie was held in protective custody since May 7 until he was finally able to be adopted on October 3!

While the BCSPCA was initially able to negotiate surrender of some cats, the owner then refused to relinquish nearly half of the animals. The organization filed a civil action against Romanisko under Pennsylvania’s Costs of Care Act to expedite adoption of the cats still held in protective custody. Unreimbursed costs to the organization had mounted to $57,543 by the time of the ruling on August 26. Romanisko failed to pay the ordered costs; therefore, ownership of the cats was automatically transferred to the BCSPCA.

“The importance of this ruling cannot be overstated,” said Executive Director Linda Reider. “While we may never see a dollar of this judgement, we are thrilled that these resilient cats who languished so long in horrendous conditions can now live free of pain and suffering in homes of their own. We ask our community to step forward now and adopt these deserving cats.”

Reider and her team are deeply grateful to pro bono counselors Joann Lytle, Ashley Turner and Allison Morrissey of McCarter & English, LLP, who filed the civil action. Lytle, lead counsel for the BCSPCA, said “our firm is privileged to represent the Bucks County SPCA in animal cruelty cases like this one, and we admire the hard work and dedication of the Bucks County SPCA staff, who rescue animals from unspeakable conditions and give them an opportunity for a better life.”

This is the third time the BCSPCA has used the Costs of Care Act to expedite the adoption of animals rescued from animal cruelty cases. The District Attorney’s office filed criminal animal cruelty charges against Romanisko, which remain pending.

54 Cats Still Need Homes

As of October 7, 90 cats and kittens from the case have been adopted with another 54 (including kittens born in care) available now or in the near future from the organization’s shelters in Lahaska and Quakertown. About 20 of the remaining cats will be adopted out as working cats, meaning they are better suited for active lifestyles in a barn, greenhouse or similar setting in need of natural rodent control.

Working Cat Adoption Event – October 12 & 13

Adopters are encouraged to act now and adopt one or more working cats this month to help the animals settle into place before the onset of cold weather. Adoption donations for working cats are waived through October 31 and a Working Cat Adoption Event is scheduled for noon-3:00 on October 12 and 13 at both BCSPCA locations.