Bucks County SPCA Private Non-Profit Serving
Bucks County Since 1912
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Tag Archives: Dogs

Flight of Fancy: Lost dog flown 900 miles to reunite with family

Fancy flies home
Pilot Jack Merritt and Upper Bucks shelter Director Vanly Pierson are flying Fancy the first leg of her journey home.

A little lost dog’s return to her beloved owners is taking place on Saturday, September 10, thanks to the valiant efforts of two non-profit organizations: Bucks County SPCA (BCSPCA) and Pilots N Paws.

“Fancy” was originally adopted from the Cheaha Regional Humane Society (CRHS) in Alabama in June 2015 to Pat and Sam Jordan. The couple report that the dog was stolen from their yard while out to exercise on a tie-out in April 2016. A community-wide multi-day search undertaken for the Jordans by a local church was unsuccessful in locating her.

Somehow Fancy made her way to Pennsylvania. She was found lost in Bucks County by a kind person who brought her to the BCSPCA in late August. The shelter scanned and traced her microchip back to the Jordans, who were thrilled beyond belief to learn she was safe. But since Sam is now wheelchair-bound, the couple’s ability to make the long journey north to reclaim her was impossible.

In stepped BCSPCA Board Member Jack Merritt, a pilot who also volunteers with Pilots N Paws, a national non-profit that coordinates pet reunion flights. Saturday morning September 10, Jack and BCSPCA Upper Bucks Shelter Director Vanly Pierson are flying the first leg of the journey with Fancy. They will transfer her to the next volunteer pilot in Roanoke, VA. Pat and Sam Jordan, along with CRHS staff will meet Fancy at her arrival destination, the Anniston Regional Airport in Alabama, and enjoy a police escort for the drive home. The entire 900-mile journey will be accomplished in a single day!

“We are delighted to be able to partner to help Fancy get back to her waiting owners,” stated Linda Reider, BCSPCA Executive Director. “Registered microchips and collars with current identification are critical to getting pets back when they are lost or stolen. Without a microchip, Fancy might never have been returned to the Jordan family.”

All three non-profit organizations (BCSPCA, Pilots N Paws, and CRHS) are supported by charitable donations. While long-distance happy-ending stories like Fancy’s are rare, the three groups together assist thousands of animals in need. Follow Fancy’s story on Facebook.

Pet Welfare and Wellness #3: Pet Socialization & Training

Free presentation! Pet Welfare & Wellness Series: From day one through grey muzzles, learn to care for your pets every step of the way. 

Benefits of Pet Socialization & Training is the third presentation of the four-part series. This presentation will focus on the benefits of socializing your puppy, the types of dog training and the benefits of having a well-trained dog. Children are welcome and will learn about pet body language. Get a glimpse of Puppy Social Hour held at Holiday House Pet Resort every Thursday from 7-8pm.

Limited Seating: Registration Required/Free General Admission Ticket

Helping 43 Chihuahuas and Their Family

ChihuahuapuppieskissOn April 23, 2015 the Bucks County SPCA, with the help of the Bensalem Police removed 32 Chihuahuas from a Bensalem residence. The dogs are safe and being well cared for at our shelters. We are also caring for 11 Chihuahuas previously removed from the residence. Clearly the circumstances leading to the ownership of so many dogs, and the removal of the dogs, were stressful for the family and the dogs alike.

The situation was brought to our attention by Bensalem animal control, and an investigation is ongoing. We’re now working cooperatively with the family of the dog owner to come to a resolution that will be good for dogs and people alike, and to return a manageable number of dogs. The family is happy for us to spay or neuter all of the dogs. As we work through this the dogs will be in our care and we will update you as they become ready for adoption. If you are interested in adopting one of these dogs, email info@bcspca.org for more information and an application. 

Remember, we are here to help. If you someone who has too many animals call us at 215.794.7425 and we can help. If you are looking for a local, low cost spay and neuter program you can contact No Nonsense Neutering, who have clinics in multiple locations, including our Upper Bucks shelter,  or Animal Alliance in Lambertville, NJ.

Watch the story on Fox 29 News and read about it in the Bucks County Courier Times.

 

 

Pet Welfare and Wellness Series

ScrappySILKYXbluetancuteThe Bucks County SPCA is partnering with Holiday House Pet Resort and Doylestown Veterinary Hospital to help you and your pets have the best possible life together. The Pet Welfare & Wellness Series will help you and your pets get the most of your relationship from day one through grey muzzles.

This free, four-part series covers Adopting a Shelter Pet, Pet First Aid, Pet Socialization & Training and Caring for Senior Pets. Attendees are invited to sign up for one or all four events. Children are welcome and each presentation will have information specifically tailored for them.

It is our hope that the Pet Welfare and Wellness Series will help head off some of the problems that all to often lead to pets being surrendered to shelters and will strengthen the bond between pets and their people.

The Pet Welfare and Wellness Series:

Adopting a Shelter Pet
March 19th, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Bucks County SPCA, Upper Bucks Shelter
60 Reservoir Road, Quakertown PA
Sign Up

Pet First Aid
April 20, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Health & Wellness Center
847 Easton Road, Warrington, PA
Sign Up

Pet Socialization and Training
May 21, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Holiday House Pet Resort
380 North Shady Retreat Road, Doylestown, PA
Sign Up

Caring for Senior Pets
June 16, 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Bucks County SPCA Lahaska Shelter
1665 Street Road, Lahaska, PA
Sign Up
All presentations are free, but seating is limited. Please use the links above to reserve your spot.

BCSPCA Celebrates 2000+ Adoptions in 2014

Tommy Shih TzuIt was an amazing year at the BCSPCA, over two thousand animals – 2,033 to be exact- got a second chance at life in 2014. Thank you to the families who opened their hearts and homes to animals in need. Our very last adoption of the year was especially heartwarming. Tommy the special needs Shih Tzu, right, is deaf and has impaired vision, but that doesn’t stop him – and it didn’t stop his new family from adopting him. Thanks to all for supporting us so we can be here for Tommy and other animals in need.

Why You Should Buy Your Dog a License

What is the Dog Law?Do Lic

It is the statute that contains provisions commonly thought of as the “leash law”. It requires licensing of all dogs over 3 months of age. It also requires kennels to be licensed, and includes provisions for inspecting and regulating kennels including large commercial kennels (which are sometimes referred to as puppy mills), nonprofit kennels like animal shelters, boarding kennels and all places that keep a cumulative total of more than 26 dogs in the course of a year. The Dog Law also contains a section on rabies vaccination which requires all dogs over 3 months of age to be vaccinated and all cats to be vaccinated if they spend any part of a 24 hour day inside a dwelling. (Cats that spend all of their time outside are not required by law to be vaccinated). If a dog does damage to livestock the Dog Law contains provisions for the livestock owner to be reimbursed from the Dog Law Restricted Account. Dangerous dogs are also covered. If a dog attacks a person or other domestic animal without provocation, a hearing can be held before a judge where evidence is presented to have the dog declared dangerous. Owners who choose to keep dangerous dogs must carry extra insurance and take additional precautions so that their dog is not a danger to others. The Dog Law also contains a section that requires that animals dogs and cats adopted from shelters or pounds in Pennsylvania must be spayed or neutered, either before they leave the shelter or soon after. It is a lengthy and complex law that covers a variety of topics related to dogs.

Who enforces the Dog Law?

The Dog Law is enforced by police or animal control officers hired local municipalities and also by state dog wardens who are employees of the Department of Agriculture. Dog wardens are the only officers with jurisdiction to inspect kennels and enforce kennel regulations. Humane society police officers cannot enforce the Dog Law. The only law that they have jurisdiction to enforce is Section 5511 of the PA Crimes Code, which covers cruelty to animals. It is no wonder that members of the public are sometimes confused about where to report a problem.

How is Dog Law enforcement funded?

All of the activities of the Bureau of Dog Law Enforcement are paid out of the Dog Law Restricted Account. The Dog Law Restricted Account is funded principally by dog license fees, kennel license fees, and to a much lesser extent by fines from Dog Law violations. None of the activities are paid for by tax money like other government services, nor are they funded by donations like the work of non-profit organizations. The restricted account pays for a staff which includes administrators, more than 60 dog wardens state wide, a new special team of 4 kennel inspectors who handle problem kennels, and a new special prosecutor to help dog wardens with their important cases in court. It also pays reimbursement for livestock damage claims, and grants to shelters and humane societies which house stray dogs. Dog lovers should know that buying their dog license is the most important step that they can take to assure that important activities like inspection of kennels continue to take place. Kennel inspection and enforcement efforts are what makes sure that dogs are being properly cared for in large commercial kennels also called “puppy mills”. Buying a dog license is a very real way to put your money where your mouth is on this important issue. A multimillion dollar budget is raised every year in $6 and $8 increments when people renew their dog licenses. Licenses are available from the County Treasurer or at the Bucks County SPCA

Why is Dog Law part of the Department of Agriculture?

Dogs are not livestock so this does not make sense to many people. The answer comes from the history of dog licensing in Pennsylvania, which has always been an agricultural state. Statewide dog licensing began around 1920 as a means to establish a fund to repay farmers for livestock damage caused by dogs. The restricted account was established and over the years the rest of the law grew around this original purpose. The restricted account assured the continued activities, since money from dog licenses cannot go into the General Fund to be spent for unrelated purposes.