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Lahaska Shelter

Mailing Address:
PO Box 277
Lahaska, PA 18931

Location:
1665 Street Road
(note: use New Hope as the town for GPS directions)

24-Hour Emergency Phone:
215-794-7425

Hours:
Monday - Friday: 10:00 to 4:00
Tuesday - 10:00 to 7:00
Saturday - 10:00 to 3:00
Sunday - 11:00 to 2:00     

Upper Bucks Shelter

60 Reservoir Rd.
Quakertown, PA 18951
Phone: 267.347.4674

Hours:
Monday - Saturday: 10am to 4pm  
Thursday: 10am to 7pm
Sunday Closed

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Sunday, 29 March 2009 02:29

Yorkies Removed From Home in Newtown

Written by  Nikki

13a_harry_32809_crop.jpgBucks County SPCA along with Upper Makefield Police Department removed 46 Yorkshire Terriers from a home in Newtown early Saturday Morning. 

These dogs are being cared for by our staff and veterinarians, and will have to stay at our shelter for an undetermined amount of time. 

We would like to thank everyone for their interest and well wishes for the Yorkies!  We are beginning the process of sorting through the large list of interested adopters and are no longer accepting names for this list.  Please do come and visit the other dogs that are waiting for homes at our shelter!

Please read more below... 

Illegal Puppy Mill Found Inside Bucks Co. Home

UPPER MAKEFIELD, Pa. (CBS 3) ―

2009-03/puppy_folo_0331.jpg

Puppies prompt parental pleas

TEXT SIZE Increase text size Decrease text size
Bucks County Courier Times

Police are continuing their investigation. Meanwhile, SPCA officials say an owner reportedly has come forward.

The Bucks County SPCA has been inundated with hundreds of adoption offers for the 46 Yorkshire terriers rescued from a suspected Upper Makefield puppy mill operation Saturday.

Shelter director Anne Irwin says the Solebury animal center has received more than 80 e-mails, "hundreds" of phone messages and dozens of visitors interested in the 37 adults dogs and nine puppies in the agency's custody.

They were found living in overcrowded cages and unsanitary conditions inside the basement of an apparently abandoned home in the 1400 block of Wrightstown Road.

No criminal charges had been filed in the case Monday, but a couple who identified themselves as the dogs' owners met with Upper Makefield police Sunday, Irwin said. The investigation is continuing and police said there would be no information released at this time.

Police discovered the dogs after receiving a complaint of loud barking around 12:30 a.m. Saturday. The caller told police there was a large number of dogs in the basement of a possibly abandoned home, and that some dogs might be dead, according to the probable cause affidavit that led to authorities getting the search warrant.

The dogs were housed in 22 animal cages. Many adult dogs had microchips implanted - which are used to identify pets - and it appears the chips were bought in batches, Irwin said.

Police found evidence that someone was providing food and water to the dogs, though there was no running water in the home.

The dogs appear healthy and are adjusting to the shelter environment, Irwin said. Two veterinarians are expected to examine the dogs today.

Yorkshire terriers, affectionately known as Yorkies, are among the most popular breeds, according to the American Kennel Club's registration statistics.

The dogs frequently carry a hefty price tag - $500 or more each, according to a search of pet Web sites.

Pennsylvania law requires a state license for people who keep or transfer 26 or more dogs annually, Irwin said. She added that the law was recently changed to require that any breeder who sells 60 or more dogs annually be categorized as a commercial kennel, which has "much higher" quality standards.

March 31, 2009 02:00 AM

The dogs were housed in 22 animal cages. Many adult dogs had microchips implanted - which are used to identify pets - and it appears the chips were bought in batches, Irwin said.

Police found evidence that someone was providing food and water to the dogs, though there was no running water in the home.

The dogs appear healthy and are adjusting to the shelter environment, Irwin said. Two veterinarians are expected to examine the dogs today.

Yorkshire terriers, affectionately known as Yorkies, are among the most popular breeds, according to the American Kennel Club's registration statistics.

The dogs frequently carry a hefty price tag - $500 or more each, according to a search of pet Web sites.

Pennsylvania law requires a state license for people who keep or transfer 26 or more dogs annually, Irwin said. She added that the law was recently changed to require that any breeder who sells 60 or more dogs annually be categorized as a commercial kennel, which has "much higher" quality standards.

March 31, 2009 02:00 AM

The dogs were housed in 22 animal cages. Many adult dogs had microchips implanted - which are used to identify pets - and it appears the chips were bought in batches, Irwin said.

Police found evidence that someone was providing food and water to the dogs, though there was no running water in the home.

The dogs appear healthy and are adjusting to the shelter environment, Irwin said. Two veterinarians are expected to examine the dogs today.

Yorkshire terriers, affectionately known as Yorkies, are among the most popular breeds, according to the American Kennel Club's registration statistics.

The dogs frequently carry a hefty price tag - $500 or more each, according to a search of pet Web sites.

Pennsylvania law requires a state license for people who keep or transfer 26 or more dogs annually, Irwin said. She added that the law was recently changed to require that any breeder who sells 60 or more dogs annually be categorized as a commercial kennel, which has "much higher" quality standards.

March 31, 2009 02:00 AM

The dogs were housed in 22 animal cages. Many adult dogs had microchips implanted - which are used to identify pets - and it appears the chips were bought in batches, Irwin said.

Police found evidence that someone was providing food and water to the dogs, though there was no running water in the home.

The dogs appear healthy and are adjusting to the shelter environment, Irwin said. Two veterinarians are expected to examine the dogs today.

Yorkshire terriers, affectionately known as Yorkies, are among the most popular breeds, according to the American Kennel Club's registration statistics.

The dogs frequently carry a hefty price tag - $500 or more each, according to a search of pet Web sites.

Pennsylvania law requires a state license for people who keep or transfer 26 or more dogs annually, Irwin said. She added that the law was recently changed to require that any breeder who sells 60 or more dogs annually be categorized as a commercial kennel, which has "much higher" quality standards.

March 31, 2009 02:00 AM

 

Last modified on Friday, 17 April 2009 03:29

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